Ohio Custody and Visitation Schedule Guidelines

The Ohio laws about parenting schedules and plans are found in Chapter 3109 of the Ohio Revised Code.

Here are some guidelines from the law to help you make your parenting time schedule.

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Parenting time instead of custody and visitation

Ohio uses the term parenting time instead of custody and visitation.

As part of your parenting plan, you need to make a parenting time schedule that shows when your child has time with each parent.

Your parenting time schedule

Your parenting time schedule should include:

You can make your schedule in a custody calendar so it's easy to see when the child is with each parent. You must also explain your schedule in legal terms for your parenting plan.

Ohio courts encourage parents to work together to create a schedule everyone supports and that gives both parents frequent and continuing contact with the child, unless it is not in the best interest of the child.

Things to consider when making your schedule

If you and the other parent agree on your schedule, the court will approve it. If you do not agree on the schedule, the court will decide what schedule is best for your child.

The court considers the following when deciding on the schedule:

  • The child's relationships with both parents, siblings, and other significant people
  • Where the parents' live and the distance between the parents' homes
  • The child's school schedule and holiday and vacation schedule
  • The parents' work schedules and holiday and vacation schedules
  • The child's age
  • The child's adjustment to home, school, and community
  • The child's wishes if the court has interviewed the child in chambers
  • The health and safety of the child
  • The amount of time that will be available for the child to spend with siblings
  • The mental and physical health of the parents and the child
  • Each parent's willingness to reschedule missed parenting time
  • If a parent has denied court ordered parenting time to the other parent
  • If either parent has moved or is planning to move out of state
  • If either parent has any history of child abuse or neglect
  • Other factors that affect the best interest of the child

Considering these factors as your make a schedule will help you make a schedule that the court will accept..

You can also look at some additional parenting time guidelines from the state of Ohio to help you make your schedule.

The court ordered parenting time schedule

If you and the other parent agree on your schedule, you can have any schedule you want.

If you do not agree on the schedule, the court will determine your schedule based on the county standard schedule or guidelines.

Court ordered schedules for children 3 and older look similar to this schedule:

Your child lives with the residential parent and visits the other parent:

  • Every other weekend from Friday at 6 pm to Sunday at 6 pm
  • One weekday evening from 5 pm to 8 pm


The parents alternate the holidays as follows:


For summer break, the father and the mother each have 4-6 weeks with the children. The parent who doesn't have parenting time gets alternating weekends and weekday visits.

If the child is younger than 3, the schedule will be made so the child has frequent contact with both parents each week.

Every county in Ohio has a standard or model schedule. The court will implement this schedule or use it as a guideline to make your schedule if you and the other parent can't agree on your schedule.

County standard parenting time schedules

Here are the standard or model parenting parenting time schedules for each county in Ohio:

Adams (Rule 16 page 34)
Allen (Rule 6 page 15)
Ashland
Ashtabula (Rule 19 page 54)
Athens
Auglaize
Belmont
Brown
Butler
Carroll
Champaign
Clark
Clermont
Clinton (Appendix 5)
Columbiana
Coshocton
Crawford
Cuyahoga
Darke
Defiance (Appendix A)
Delaware
Erie
Fairfield
Fayette (Appendix G)
Franklin
Fulton
Gallia
Geauga
Greene
Guernsey (Exhibit H page 46)
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardin (Rule 26 page 76)
Harrison
Henry
Highland (Local rules Appendix G)
Hocking (Exhibit A page 55)
Holmes
Huron
Jackson
Jefferson
Knox
Lake
Lawrence (Rule 53 page 15)
Licking
Lorain
Lucas
Madison (Rule 6.17)
Mahoning
Marion
Medina
Meigs (Appendix page 28)
Mercer
Miami
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Morrow
Muskingum (Appendix C)
Noble
Ottawa
Paulding
Perry (Appendix A page 32)
Pickaway (Rule 18.11 page 47)
Pike
Portage
Preble
Putnam (Rule 28 page 19)
Richland (Rule 24 page 38)
Ross (Rule 21.10 page 25)
Sandusky (Appendix D page 27)
Scioto
Seneca (Rule 40)
Shelby
Stark
Summit
Trumbull
Tuscarawas
Union
Van Wert
Vinton (Rule 17 page 8)
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Williams (Appendix A page 76)
Wood
Wyandot
 

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Make Your Ohio Schedule Now

The top twenty cities in Ohio (by population, US Census Bureau, 2008) are: Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Akron, Dayton, Canton, Parma, Youngstown, Lorain, Hamilton, Springfield, Elyria, Kettering, Mentor, Middleton, Cuyahoga Falls, Lakewood, Mansfield, Euclid.

Custody X Change is software that creates parenting time schedules, calendars, and professional parenting plan documents.

Make Your Schedule